Do Not Let Us Fall Into Temptation

When I heard that the pope wanted to change the translation of what I call, “The Lord’s Prayer” and Catholics call the “Our Father” I thought, oh great, let’s monkey with something else.
 
Perhaps it was because, while perusing FB last evening, I saw a post that said that someoneradio stations were pulling the song, “Do You Hear What I Hear?” because it was offensive to schizophrenics.
 
I commented, “is that a joke?”
 
I mentioned it to Nick, and he said, “No, it is no joke.”
 
Good Gucci bags for all.
 
So, I put up the hood on my new Duke sweatshirt and slunk into my recliner.
 
Oh, for the record … now really a Duke fan, but I was freezing while walking through T.J. Max and walked by a bright blue Duke sweatshirt and thought, hum looks like that is warm and it will fit and I grabbed it. Go Blue devils. Whoops. Shouldn’t say that … it has the word ‘devil’ in it.
 
As a writer and as a human with a bit of an attitude aout words, I really dislike certain words being hijacked and pretty much put into political correctness time out.
 
We have become way too sensitive and silly.
 
So, back to the above Our Father.
 
I am not Catholic, so, it really isn’t my business as to what the pope says or what he does. But that doesn’t stop me from observing and being interested in the Catholic Church, as it has held a fascination with me since my upbrining in Norwood.
 
I loved the Catholic churches in Norwood. There were many, each with its own school where kids wore uniforms and got off school for lots of Holy Days and they had great festivals.
 
They were much more exciting than the NPC, Norwood Presbyterian Church. Although the Mama’s cookies and Kool-Aid were good at vacation Bible school, most of the time, being a Presbyterian was rather bland. And don’t get me started on trying to find a runner-free pair of panty hose to wear to church.
 
I have believed, probably naively, that there are certain things that “just are.” Things that you don’t change.
 
That has been a great fallacy in my thinking. I learned that things change. When I was little, I thought certain stores were always “there” and always would be there. It caught me off guard when stores closed or even worse, changed names. Mabely and Carew, McAlpins, Shillitos, and these days, Time Warner, into Spectrum.
 
I dislike rocking my mental hourse in such a way.
 
So, since this is jumping around a bit, let me through in that the sun is out and the skies anre the Carolina Blue and I have gifts to wrap and I need to vacuum.
 
And life is good.
 
Back to the pope.
 
I was ready to tsk, tsk, his idea before I even read what or why. I can do that, you know … think things before I think things.
 
So, I looked up what the pope wanted to do. I was ready with my sarcasm and snickery attitude.
 
And then I read what and why he wanted to change.
 
I agreed with him and saw what he was saying as a positive.
 
It goes baack to words, translations, and words getting lost in translation.
 
“Lead us not into temptation,” was the passage thta the pope thought was not in the vein of what God wanted. Now, who really knows what God wants? Go ahead, argue about that, but it is just a visceral type question.
 
As I sat and said the Lord’s Prayer, which has that same line … and I found that everything else is said in a positive way, one of praise and prayer and was not in an accusatory way. But tht line, “Lead us not into temptation,” according to my understanding of what thepope was trying to convey, makes it sound that God sets us up and waits for us to fall. In truth, if you believe it, that is not the God that is spoken about in the prayer. And don’t we, as humans, set ourselves up for temptation?
 
So, I found that a very good study of the prayer and in my mind, the pope went up a pedestal, in my book.
 
A better way of saying it is, which some French churches have adopted, is, “do not let us fall into temptation.”
 
I like that. Viva La France!
 
After reading that bit and seeing how I had almost tripped myself up with a snarky mindset, I was pleased with myself for doing a bit of maturing, growing and finding my open mind.
 
That was an excellent start to my day.
 
Susan